Tag Archives: Tanzania

In Search of Africa’s Ultimate Safari Destinations

In 2016, Jake Hoddinott and Donovan Rule set out on a mammoth overland trip through the wildest areas of Sub-Saharan Africa, with the goal of finding Africa’s ultimate safari destination. They visited South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda, and Kenya. Their travels took them to many places off the beaten track. This was an unforgettable experience for them, and an inspiration for the rest of us. They were able to acquire a wealth of knowledge, so that we too can find the ultimate safari destination, without the trial and error they faced.

Here are some of the highlights from their unforgettable adventure.

Botswana

The Okavango Delta remains one of their all-time favourite places, not only in Africa, but in the world. The sheer bird and wildlife concentrations of the region is amazing. Here, one can watch elephants cross a crystal clear channel that’s just a little too deep for the youngest members of the herd, so that all that is visible are their wettened trunks. At the same time, you can enjoy a sundowner while casting a line for an African pike or a tackle-busting nembwe, all to the tune of the omnipresent African fish eagle. A truly unique experience!

Whilst Botswana has adopted a high-value, low-impact model with respect to tourism, making it a relatively expensive trip, the richness of its wildlife biodiversity is unrivalled, and the swamps are a truly special place.

Namibia

Namibia: Breathtaking landscapes, massive expanses of seeming nothingness… the rust-red sand dunes of the Namib, and oases of wildlife dotted throughout the country. Add in the feeling that, culturally and economically, you haven’t really left home, and Namibia becomes a very appealing option.

Zimbabwe

Chitake Springs is a truly wonderful Zambian destination. Unfenced camps, a real sense of wilderness, and one of the few wildlife parks that allow unguided walks make it a superb safari destination. And just 50km north, both the  Zambezi and the iconic Mana Pools can be found. Jake and Donovan didn’t see any other people during their stay, bar the Anti-Poaching Unit. This was possibly due to the time of the year that they visited, and a real sense of being in the wild pervaded. This made it a very special part of the trip, somewhat reminiscent of their time at Lake Tagalala in the Selous.

Zambia

Liuwa Plain National Park is unique, with rural communities continuing to exist within the park boundaries. It is a great example of a sustainable solution to Africa’s growing population and the potential human-wildlife conflicts that result. The local communities have a participatory stake in the park, and benefit directly from the tourism associated with the park, creating an ecosystem where people and wildlife co-exist. Liuwa is home to Africa’s second-largest wildebeest migration, and has been the site of many positive changes since African Parks began managing the park in 2003. These include a growing pride of lions, increasing cheetah numbers, and drastically-reduced poaching. Jake and Donovan enjoyed some incredibly special sunsets, observing massive lines of wildebeest, with thousands of black-winged pratincoles landing and taking-off in the ensuing dust cloud, all punctuated by the ubiquitous spotted hyena. The Zambian people were some of the friendliest they encountered, which added a wonderful warmth to the experience.

Tanzania

Ruaha National Park, Katavi National Park, and Selous Game Reserve offered up some truly incredible wildlife sightings, accompanied by a genuine sense of wilderness and solitude. Tanzania has some challenges- the traffic officials can become tiresome, and the park fees (USD denominated) are very high. When Jake and Donovan arrived, the parks had just added 18% VAT to all park fees under the premise that this would see an improvement in facilities. This was not something they could really attest to, as the facilities they encountered were extremely basic, if any were provided at all. However,  when it comes to a wilderness experience and wildlife densities, the parks of Tanzania’s southern circuit really are exceptional.

This is just a fraction of what Jake and Donovan experienced on their incredible expedition. The African continent has so much to offer, such wonders to see. Don’t you think it is worth your time to visit some of these spots for yourself?

Serengeti Walking Safari

The Serengeti in Tanzania is one of Africa’s most iconic safari destinations. The wide open plains of grassland and savannah are home to thriving populations of Africa’s quintessential wildlife species, including vast numbers of plains game, fearsome predators, and the famous African Big 5.

While it is true that African safaris are traditionally conducted in open game-viewing vehicles, there are many other unique and exciting ways in which the African wilderness can be explored. A walking safari is one of the most thrilling ways to have an African bushveld experience. On a walking safari, you are able to connect with your surroundings in a much more intimate and up-close way.

These Serengeti walking safari tours are led by experienced guides and armed rangers, who will enhance your game-viewing experience and make sure that you feel completely safe out in the wilderness. You are also accompanied by a safari chef and camp assistant, all of who will ensure your safety and comfort, and strive to ensure that you have the best possible game-viewing opportunities.

There are two walking safari tour options: a 7-day/6-night tour, or a 5-day/4-night tour. On the tours, you spend approximately 4 to 5 hours a day walking, with some of the nights spent at luxury wilderness safari lodges, and others out “camping” under the stars in the African bush. The “camps” are fully-equipped and feature walk-in dome tents, bedding and mattresses, bush toilets and showers, mess tents, chairs, fridges/cool boxes, and camp lighting.

The tours are conducted in pristine wilderness areas inside the Serengeti National Park, away from busy crowds and safari vehicles. The 7-day/6-night tour also includes a visit to the Ngorongoro Crater, another of Tanzania’s iconic wildlife destinations, where wildlife is found in abundance and the chances of spotting the members of the Big 5 are high. There is also the option of stopping at the Olduvai Gorge, a world-renowned paleoanthropological site. Guided game drives are also included in the safari tour package- but it is the walking safaris that are the undoubted highlight.