Liuwa Plains: An Undiscovered Safari Paradise

Liuwa Plains National Park, situated in western Zambia, is truly a hidden safari gem. This remote park practically calls out for travelers to come and explore its vast open grasslands and seemingly endless horizons. Pristine and unspoilt, with wildlife spread out across the plains, the park makes for a real treat when out on safari. There is always something to see.

Delving into the history of Liuwa Plains, one will find that the park is one of the oldest in Africa, having been established in the late 19th century by King Lubosi Lewanika. It thus boasts a rather unique ecosystem, whereby the people of the plains and the wildlife co-exist in such a way as to preserve the rustic beauty of the park.

Dramatic thunderstorms are known to light up the ominous skies, contrasting with the green and gold of the plains. This makes for spectacularly beautiful photographic opportunities. But these breathtaking forces of nature are not the only reason to visit Liuwa Plains. The park also plays host to what is perhaps the best-kept secret in Zambia- the world’s second-largest wildebeest migration.

Thousands of wildebeest travel across Liuwa Plains each year, following the rains as they make their way across the plains. Along with the wildebeest herds, you will also find plenty of other animals, including zebra, oribi, red lechwe, and steenbok. These plains animals, in turn, draw predators after them. Look out especially for cheetahs and lions- their populations are slowly growing after being poached to near extinction in the park. Liuwa also has a well-established spotted hyena population.

What is the best time to visit Liuwa Plains? Although it is difficult to pinpoint an exact time, as the migration is dependent on the rains, the window is normally between August and December.

King Lewanika Lodge

When it comes to accommodation, Liuwa Plains is a little different. There is only one fixed lodge in the park, called King Lewanika Lodge. This luxury lodge is made up of six plush villas that are perched on raised platforms to maximise views of the surrounding plains. Five campsites make up the rest of the accommodation options in the park: Kayala, Katoyana, Kwale, Lyangu, and Sikale. Each is located in a different area of the park, and can accommodate up to 20 guests. Only 4 guests are allowed per campground, making the setting intimate and private, and allowing you to enjoy the expanses of solitude in peace.

Liuwa Plains Campsite

If you are looking for an off-the-beaten-track safari destination that abounds with untamed beauty, look no further than Liuwa Plains.

What are the best Kruger Camps to visit?

 

Heading to the Kruger Park is super exciting but the planning can be both an exhilarating and daunting undertaking. With 12 main camps, 5 satellite camps, 5 bush camps, and 2 overnight hides, not to mention luxury lodges and wilderness trails, you are forgiven for not knowing which to choose and what to expect when staying in one of the Kruger camps.

Here are our 5 favourite Kruger Camps and what you can expect:

Punda Maria Rest Camp

The Northernmost Kruger Camp is first on our list and with good reason. Punda Maria is perhaps the best camp for birding in the whole of the Kruger. This lush green camp is known for sightings of Paradise Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied and Terrestrial Bulbul, Bearded Robin and Black Eagle, all this before even leaving the camp itself!
Running in a 25-kilometre course around the camp is the Mahonie loop, perhaps the most rewarding birding drives in the Kruger. A patient birder will be rewarded for taking their time on this trail by being able to spot Yellow Oxpecker, White-breasted Cuckooshrike, Crested Guineafowl, Cape Parrot, Yellow-spotted Nicator, Stierling’s Barred Warbler and Dickinson’s Kestrel. A select few might even see the Narina Trogon, a shy and elusive species.

Lower Sabie Rest Camp

Lower Sabie is situated in the southern region of the Kruger Park and is a very popular family destination. With an abundance of foliage and watering holes, there is plenty of game, making Lower Sabie ideal for game drives.
There is always something to see in the region. Lions are quite common as well as Cheetah. Lower Sabie is also a great location for viewing White Rhino and there are large herds of Buffalo that roam the area. The watering holes and dams also make it an ideal place for birding as there is a variety of bird species close to the water’s edge.

Olifants Rest Camp

If panoramic Kruger views are what you are after look no further, Olifants is one of the best Kruger camps for breath taking vistas. Set on a hill, the camp overlooks the Olifants River and long stretches of bushveld.
Olifants offer a wide range of game due to the fact that it is a transitional zone, where one ecosystem flows into another. To the North Mopane trees provide cover for Zebra and Impala while the rolling plains to the south are home to Buffalo and Giraffe.
Ideally placed shaded lookout platforms along the Olifants River makes it easy to view the river’s edge and gives views of Hippopotamus, Crocodiles and the occasional Lion kill.

Letaba Rest Camp

Letaba is perhaps the best of the Kruger camps for first time visitors to the Kruger. It offer a wide range of accommodation options, ranging from air conditioned bungalows, safari tents, 2 guesthouses, rusting huts and camp sites, making it ideal for those on their first safari as well as experienced campers.
The camp is green and lush, known for its large trees and indigenous gardens. Bushbuck wander freely around the camp and other residents include Tree Squirrels, Fruit Bats and Vervet Monkeys.
Letaba is known for the large mammals that call the area home, particularly around the Letaba River’s sandy riverbed. Lion and Cheetah kills have been known to take place in the riverbed as well, a real treat for those visiting the restaurant which overlooks it.

Satara Rest Camp

Satara is one of the best Kruger camps to visit if seeing the big cats are on your itinerary. Lion, Leopard and Cheetah pray on the grazers that call the area home due to the fertile grazing lands that surround the camp.
The other members of Big 5 (Elephants, Buffalo and Rhino) are also spotted frequently in this part of the park. Blue Wildebeest, Zebra, Waterbuck, Giraffe and Impala are also plentiful and Honey Badgers are a rare treat for those on safari.

Each of these Kruger camps are definitely worth a visit. Each has their own charm and attractions, making the Kruger the ideal safari destination. If you are still unsure which the ideal camp is for you, look no further; simply drop us a line and we will help you plan your ideal Kruger experience.

 

What to know about visiting South Africa

Heading to South Africa?  Need to know what to pack? Unsure about visas or malaria? Here is what you need to know:

Do you need a Visa to visit South Africa?

South Africa is a Visa-free country to a large number of countries and for those that are not on this list a Visa can easily be organised at your local South African embassy. The following countries are exempt from needing a Visa – but remember it is always a good idea just to contact the South African embassy to confirm.

Visas are NOT needed by the following nationals:

-Australia                 -Austria                                -Belgium

-Canada                    -Denmark                            -Finland

-France                      -Germany                            -Greece

-Iceland                     -Ireland                                 -Italy

-Monaco                   -Netherlands                     -Norway

-Portugal                 -Russian Federation       -Spain

-Sweden                 -Switzerland                       -United Kingdom

-United States of America

 Climate

South Africa has been described as having the best climate in the world. It’s an ideal holiday destination year round as the country enjoys warm, sunny days throughout the year and mildly chilly nights during the winter months. Rainfall occurs in the summer months, (November to March) except for the Cape region which has the bulk of its rainfall during the winter months of June to August.

When is the best time to visit? Although South Africa can be visited at any time of the year safaris best undertaken during the winter months of April to October while Cape Town and the Garden Route are great to head to in summer months from October to March.

 Malaria

There are some areas in South Africa where malaria occurs. Malaria is a common illness found in the Sub-Saharan areas of Africa and is transmitted via the female anopheles mosquito. Most of South Africa is malaria-free though.

The anopheles mosquito that carries the malaria disease are found in the far north and east of the country in the Limpopo, Mpumalanga and northern Kwa-Zulu Natal areas.

Which areas are known for having malaria?

The following areas are known for being high risk Malaria areas; the Kruger National Park. the game parks and coastline in the northern half of KwaZulu-Natal and the northern and eastern parts of Limpopo.

The high risk months are the summer months of September to May when rainfall is at its highest.

What precautions to take?

– Speak to your local doctor about taking anti-malaria prophylactic medication.

– It is advisable to wear long-sleeved shirts and long-sleeved trousers at night (mosquitoes tend to be most active in the early evening).

– Make use of insect repellents on a regular basis, spraying any exposed skin every hour.

– If possible burn insecticide oils or candles in your bedroom.

– Sleep under a mosquito net. Nets are available in most upmarket safari lodges in malaria areas.

Crime

South Africa is a country of warm smiles, sun filled days and fascinating cultural diversity. It unfortunately also has a reputation for being a country with a high crime rate. While not completely inaccurate, statistics are high/ However most crime takes place in ‘crime hotspots’ which are mainly focused in inner city and some economically depressed urban areas. Although it is unlikely that one will experience crime first hand, it is advisable to always be aware of your surroundings, keep an eye on belongings and do not flash them about and follow your guide or accommodation’s recommendations of which areas to avoid.

Exploring the Highlights of South Africa

South Africa is divided in to nine provinces, each with its own charm and attractions that you can choose to visit. From the hip and happening metropolis’s of Gauteng to the laid back ‘fairest Cape of them all’, to the game rich savannahs of Mpumalanga to the mountain kingdoms of KwaZulu Natal, there is so much on offer for everyone to experience and enjoy.

Western Cape

The Western Cape is home to Africa’s southernmost point and its heart is the Mother City – the stirring City of Cape Town. The iconic Table Mountain, The impressive Cape Point, Nelson Mandela’s prison on Robben Island and the beaches and thick forests of the Garden Route all have to be visited. Inland from the coast, which boarders both the Indian and Atlantic oceans, one will find the majestic Cape wine lands, which offer wine-tasting excursions of Cape Town. Table Mountain dominates the skyline of Cape Town. Set in a National park, great for hiking to enjoy the beautiful fynbos in its natural habitat.

Great for: Road-tripping, wining and dining, the incredible natural and cultural attractions.

Eastern Cape

The Eastern Cape frontier has an interesting climate ranging from the semi-desert Karoo to the lush rainforests of Alexandria. The province is generally flat and mountainous in sections with ranges such as the Stormberg and Drakensberg providing great hiking and biking trails. It home to the famous Addo Elephant National Park as well as several other well-known private game reserves such as Shamwari and Amakhala and is a no malaria area. For those looking at raw and rustic travel experiences, the Wild Coast awaits and is ever popular with backpackers.

Great for: Bush and beach combination holidays, malaria-free safaris, family holidays and hiking tours tours.

KwaZulu-Natal

Kwazulu-Natal, the home of the Zulu kingdom, stretches from the Drakensberg mountain range in the west, through the rolling hills of the natal midlands and the savannahs of northern Zululand to the tropical beaches on the Indian Ocean. This province is diverse in its offerings. Exotic beach resorts dot the coast while inland mountain retreats and quaint BnB’s allow one to relax and unwind. For good reason Kwazulu-Natal is a popular vacation destination for the locals of South Africa and is definitely worth a visit.

Great for: Battlefield tours, exceptional game parks such as Hluluwe-Imfolozi and Phinda, hiking the Berg, lazing about in beautiful warm oceans.

North West

The North West consists of rolling grassland and savannahs that rise slowly up into the Magaliesberg mountain range. Along the southern border of the province one will find the Vaal River, one of the largest rivers in South Africa and a watersports hotspot. The North West Provice is home to the gambling and golfing Mecca of Sun City and the Palace of the Lost City. Two of South Africa’s top malaria-free safari destinations are found here in the Pilanesberg National Park and Madikwe Game Reserve.

Great for: Malaria free safaris, short-break safari holidays, hiking the Magaliesburg and hot-air balloon safaris.

Limpopo

Limpopo is South Africa’s northern most province and is named after the Limpopo River basin which flows along its boundary. Limpopo is South Africa’s gateway to Africa as it shares borders with Botswana, Zimbabwe and Mozambique. The province is home to several incredibly large Baobab trees, world heritage sites featuring bushmen rock art sites, iron age artifacts and fossilized dinosaur footprints. The province is home to fantastic safari parks such as Kruger, Mapungubwe and Marakele.

Great for: Big 5 safaris, malaria free safaris in the Waterberg, birding safaris, incredible landscapes and cultural heritage.

Northern Cape

The Northern Cape is South Africa’s largest province in terms of ground area. It dominated by semi desert like landscape which comprises large tracts of the Karoo, Namaqualand and Kalahari. Wild daisies carpet the arid Namaqualand region in the springtime, drawing thousands to enjoy this natural phenomenon. The province is also known for its gemstones. The Big Hole in Kimberley which was dug by hand is of particular historical interest and where the largest diamonds have been unearthed.

Great for: Star-gazing in the Karoo, Kalahari big cat game viewing, Kimberley Big Hole, flowering Namaqualand, paddling the Orange River.

Free State

The Free State is locally known as South Africa’s breadbasket as it is situated on flat grassy plains which provides rich soil for farming the county’s grains. Towards the northern part of the province the flat lands arch in elevation as they lift to form the Maluti Mountains. This area plays host to the famous Golden Gate Highlands National Park which has some of the most beautiful vistas due to its higher elevation. The smaller towns such as Clarens are great stop overs on road trips and host interesting arts and crafts communities.

Great for: Hiking the Golden Gate Mountains, Clarens village tours, road tripping on open roads.

Mpumalanga

Mpumalanga is well known for as South Africa’s premier safari destinations as it hosts the finest safari lodges and bush camps such as the Kruger camps, in and around the iconic Kruger National Park. This province is mainly made up of the Lowveld which forms the base of the Drakensberg Escarpment in the west and stretches out all the way to the Mozambique border in the east. This massive expanse of bushveld and wilderness is home to an awe-inspiring abundance of animal, plant, bird and reptile species. The area is also known for being one of the best places on the planet to see the Big 5 in the wild.

Great for: Classic big 5 safari hotspot, Kruger National Park, Kruger Camps, super luxury lodges, Blyde River Canyon.

Gauteng

The economic hub of South Africa, Gauteng (meaning place of gold due to its origins in the gold rush of the early 1900’s), plays host to the famous Cradle of Humankind where the oldest hominoid fossils have been discovered. It has breath-taking botanical gardens, sophisticated first-world cities, vibrant townships to explore and smaller game reserves great for day visits. Most of the province is on what is known as the Highveld, which is a high-altitude grasslands which slope down into the savannahs of the bordering provinces and rise into the Magalieberg Mountains and Witwatersrand.

Great for: Cradle of Humankind tours, Anti-apartheid and mining museums, superb restaurants and shopping malls.

Zambia Lodges

The Southern African country of Zambia,  named for the mighty Zambezi River that flows through its borders, is a safari and nature treasure. It is home to 19 incredible national parks and reserves.

The safari accommodation found in the country is not only affordable, but are some of the best on the continent, each offering a unique experience, tailored to reflect the park or reserve they are located in.

These are some of the best Zambia lodges on offer:

 Gorges Lodge

As far as Zambia Lodges go, Gorges Lodge, located in the Victoria Falls National Park, is one one of the best. It offers stunning vistas over the Zambezi River from its perch above Batoka Gorge. Not for the faint of heart, the main lodge is set on the very edge of the gorge, 250 meters above the raging waters below.  The accommodation, ten stone and thatched chalets, is set against an indigenous garden backdrop, and each has a private deck from which to take in the stunning surrounds and wildlife.

Gorges Lodge is perfect for those with an adventurous spirit. Its location in the Victoria Falls National Park allows guests access to activities such as elephant back safaris, white water rafting and bungee jumping.

King Lewanika Lodge

For those looking for Zambia Lodges that offer something a bit more on the wild side, one need look no further than King Lewanika Lodge, right in the heart of Liuwa Plains National Park‘s vast grassy floodplains.

King Lewanika Lodge is the only fixed lodge in the park, and is made up of 6 luxurious villas. Each villa is raised above the surrounding plains, allowing for magnificent views of the plentiful wildlife of the area.

Mfuwe Lodge

If you would prefer a Zambia Lodge a touch more on the luxurious side, look no further than Mfuwe Lodge, the jewel of  South Luangwa National Park. It boasts every luxury one could wish for, and more. 18 bespoke chalets have private decks that look out over the banks of a lagoon.

The lodge features top-notch facilities that include a spa, outdoor gym, and excellent dining facilities. Also on offer are superb safari activities, such as thrilling night drives and guided walking tours.

Mfuwe Lodge is also known for its four-footed guests- a herd of elephants has tried checking in at reception before- a uniquely African event!

There are many more Zambia lodges to choose from, each with their own unique surrounds and offerings. Contact us to experience one of these magnificent lodges and enjoy the beauty Zambia has to offer.

Something Different: Non-motorised Safaris

The mention of an African safari usually conjures up images of bushveld landscapes, gravel roads, and 4x4s. While traditional game drives in open safari vehicles are still one of the best ways to experience a classic African safari, a variety of new safari methods are now on offer. These non-motorised safari techniques offer fresh and unique ways to explore the African wilderness.

Walking safaris

Walking safaris are undoubtedly one of the most thrilling ways to experience a safari. Being on foot allows to you experience your surroundings up close and in a much more personal way than you would in a vehicle. You are able to take in every little detail; you can see, hear, smell, touch, and even taste your surroundings! Encountering wildlife on foot will bring an unforgettable rush of adrenaline.

Plenty of safari destinations now offer guided walking safaris- but one of the best places for this experience is the South Luangwa in Zambia.

Horseback Safaris

Explore the African wilderness in the same way that early travelers and explorers once did- on horseback! As with a walking safari, a horseback safari allows you to get much closer to your surroundings than a vehicle would. There is a wonderful variety of parks and reserves that offer guided horseback safaris, catering for everyone from young children and beginners to experienced riders. Explore iconic safari destinations like the Kruger, the Masai Mara, and Victoria Falls on horseback, or chose to visit places such as the Tswalu Kalahari or Ant’s Nest Reserves in South Africa. You can even choose to do a multi-day horseback trail in the Mashatu region of Botswana.

Mokoro Safaris

A mokoro is a traditional dugout canoe that is mainly used for water-based safaris in the Okavango Delta region of Botswana. The guide stands on a flattened platform at the back of the boat, propelling it using a long pole. You are taken on an exciting journey along the waterways and channels of the area, using your unique vantage point to help you spot wildlife species.

While Botswana is the prime mokoro safari destination, a number of other regions where you can enjoy them as well, including Victoria FallsKafue National Park in Zambia, and Mana Pools in Zimbabwe. Excellent camps in Botswana to visit include Pom Pom Camp, Machaba Camp, and Pelo Camp.

Gorilla Trekking Safari

Mountain Gorilla

The words gorilla trekking safari conjure up an iconic image, Dian Fossey surrounded by a troup of majestic black gorillas in a sea of green foliage. For any would-be-naturalist this is a once in a lifetime experience – sitting in close proximity to one of humankind’s closest primate relatives. A gorilla trekking safari allows you to experience the wonder of coming in contact with these magnificent and powerful creatures.

A gorilla trekking safari is one of the most unique and memorable safaris one can undertake in Africa. Exploring the expansive rain forests of central Africa on foot does not only bring one in touch with nature, but also allows you to observe gorillas and other primate species in their natural habitat.

Guide blends in to the foliage in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park

 

The guides who accompany you on the gorilla trekking safari are true experts in their fields. They know which gorilla families occupy which areas as well as which patterns they move in, ensuring that your gorilla trekking safari meets its intended gorilla family. While on route the guides will point out other animals you might meet along the way such as the Uganda Kob, Forest Buffalo or Colobus Monkey and a variety of bird species from brightly coloured Turaco’s to the secretive Broadbill.

Mother and baby

Upon discovering the family of gorillas your guide will allow you to spend an hour’s worth of observation time with that particular family. Here time slows and you you will spend the session watching the family going about their daily routine of feeding, playing and communicating,. Highlights are no doubt the young playing in the foliage while the mothers keep a close eye or when a massive Silverback passes by close to you.

Volcanoes National Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

With tours spanning over Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, the Congo’s Odzala-Kokoua National Park and Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park there are numerous opportunities to find your perfect gorilla trekking safari. From the novice to the expert trekker everyone can see these wonderful creatures int he wild.

Bwindi Impenetrable National Park

 

This is one for the bucket list, nothing can beat meeting a families of gorillas in the forests of Africa. Get in touch with the Safari Index to tick off your dream gorilla trekking safari!

The Kruger Park

South Africa’s world-renowned Kruger National Park spans over 2 million unspoiled hectares and is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. The Kruger Park, as it is known locally, is one of the world’s most fertile and abundant wildlife sanctuaries, and famously hosts the majestic Big 5. The Kruger Park is a dream destination for anyone wishing for a safari getaway.

Kruger Park guided safari

There is plenty to see when out on a game drive while in the Kruger Park.  The park’s incredible diversity of life includes 336 tree species, 507 bird species and 147 mammal species. Whether you choose to do a self-drive safari or guided game drive, there are plenty of ways to see what the Kruger Park has to offer. When doing a self-drive safari, you need not be concerned about wear and tear on your vehicle, as the Kruger Park boasts a well-maintained road infrastructure.

 

RWS walking safari

Driving safaris are not the only type of safari on offer in the Kruger. Several camps, like Rhino Walking Safaris Plains Camp, offer walking safaris, where keen-eyed, well-informed guides are able to find even the most elusive animals.

The famous African Big 5- consisting of the lion, leopard, rhino (white and black), elephant and Cape buffalo- can be found in the Kruger Park. The highlight of any Kruger safari is spotting all 5 members out in their natural habitat. Imagine being on an early-morning walking tour, the sun rising above the plains, and spotting a family of elephants in the distance. Picture enjoying sundowner drinks with a view of a waterhole, where a pride of lions joins you in enjoying some refreshments after a hot day. The Kruger Park is a magical place where just such occurrences can take place.

The Kruger Park offers different accommodation options to suit anyone’s budget and taste. From the versatile accommodation types at Skukuza Rest Camp, to the rustic rondawels of Pretoriuskop Rest Camp, to the more luxurious lodges like Singita Lebombo, there is something to suit everyone.

Singita Lebombo
Pretoriuskop Rest Camp

No matter what your budget, there is something for everyone to enjoy. Let the experts at Safari Index help you find the best option for your pocket. Contact us today to book your dream safari getaway to the Kruger  Park.

Cape Town and the Garden Route

Expansive beaches, breathtaking mountain views and ancient forests- these are just some of the features that you can expect to encounter when traveling along South Africa‘s famous Garden Route. Known for its diverse landscape and vegetation, this 300km route stretches from the Storms River in the Eastern Cape all the way down to Mossel Bay in the Western Cape. Traveling on the Garden Route will give you the perfect opportunity to not only see perhaps the most beautiful part of the country, but also to partake in a variety of experiences.

The Garden Route is like no other, a paradise for those with a love for nature. Found between the Outeniqua Mountains and the ocean, the area features a mild climate, which allows for a mixture of fynbos, wetlands and forests to thrive. The Route is also a paradise for animal lovers. There are nearly 300 species of birds, several types of large and small game, as well as a diversity of marine life found in the region- safari opportunities are plentiful. You can even see the Big 5 in Gondwana Game Reserve or Sanbona Game Reserve.

A number of smaller game reserves can be found dotted along the Garden Route, allowing for visitors to enjoy a variety of activities. Hiking is a popular activity, as there is a lot to explore. The Knysna Forest is world-famous for its population of ancient Outeniqua Yellowwoods, while the Table Mountain Nature Reserve is home to the world’s smallest yet most diverse floral kingdom- the Cape Floral Kingdom.

For those interested in history, the Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve is the perfect place to visit. This World Heritage Site offers informative tours led by experienced guides, who take guests to over 130 bushman painting sites. The area is also famous for the indigenous rooibos that grows there.

There is also plenty to do for those looking for adventure or an adrenaline rush. Go shark-cage diving, canoeing, rock-climbing, quad biking, paragliding, and even skydiving! The world’s highest bungee jump is located along the Garden Route, at the Bloukrans Bridge. There is also horse-riding, zip-lining, sandboarding, surfing, and whale and dolphin-watching- the list is endless…

There is something for every nature lover on the Garden Route. It is the most beautiful part of the Cape, and definitely worth the trip. The Safari Index team will expertly help you to plan your Garden Route holiday- contact us today.

The Great Wildebeest Migration

Africa’s annual Great Wildebeest Migration is the world’s largest overland animal migration. This spectacular phenomenon occurs when approximately two million wildebeest, zebra and other indigenous antelope undertake an incredible journey across the African plains, from Tanzanias beautiful Serengeti to the world-renowned Masai Mara in Kenya.

The Migration does not just consist of one large herd, but rather thousands of smaller ones that branch in and out of the main bulk, depending on the availability of food and water. The sizes of the herds fluctuate, as some wildebeest do not travel, choosing to stay in specific areas.

It is also interesting to note that during the Migration, the wildebeest and zebra travel harmoniously together. Though both species are herbivores, their feeding preferences differ greatly, as they prefer different parts of the same grasses. This means that while they inhabit the same space, they are not in competition for the same resources.

The thrill of the Migration is also enhanced by the presence of predators. As the herbivores cross the plains in their thousands, they are closely pursued by fearsome carnivores. More than 3 000 lions prey upon the herds, bringing down thousands of wildebeest each season. These losses are replenished during the rainy season between January and March, as the herds roam the Serengeti. It is speculated that over half a million wildebeest are born during this period.

Other predators can also be spotted preying on the herds, including hyena, cheetah, and leopard. These predators do not migrate with the herds. Rather the herds move through their territories, making them ideal prey. However, some predators have become nomadic and spend their lives in pursuit of these herds.

Crocodiles also lie in wait as the wildebeest and zebras attempt to cross over the Mara and Grumeti Rivers, ready to prey upon any who are not strong or quick enough. These crossings typically take place during the dry season when the animals make their way to the greener grazing fields of the Masai Mara.

While herd movements depend on the availability of food and water, the animals can be seen to travel in a general clockwise direction during the Great Migration. This gives the discerning traveller ample opportunity to witness the incredible phenomenon all year round. Several well-appointed lodges and camps cater to the seasoned as well as first-time viewer of the Migration. One can easily find accommodation that will suit your particular needs and provide the perfect opportunity to see this awe-inspiring spectacle.

The Great Migration Pattern

The Great Migration takes place annually, spanning the whole year. This allows for a Migration safari trip at any time of the year, depending on where the herds are. Don’t you think that this is an experience that should be on your bucket list? Chat to one of the Safari Index team of experts today to plan that dream Migration safari now!

 

The Safari Index is an online index of safari destinations in Southern and Eastern Africa, showcasing hundreds of game lodges, camps, game reserves and national parks in Africa.